Meal Exchange Facebook Sierra Youth Coalition Facebook Meal Exchange Twitter Sierra Youth Coalition Twitter Rss

Magnesium chloride uses in Farming/Agriculture

Posted by on in CAMPUS NEWS
sdfasdf1

Plant growth requires nutrients found in atmosphere and soil. Plants depend on primary nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium and secondary nutrients calcium and magnesium. Micronutrients boron, copper, manganese chloride, zinc, etc. bring total elements needed for plant growth to 16, not including trace nutrients cobalt, selenium, and silica that also support growth.

Absorption

Ionized nutrients dissolve in water carrying positive or negative charges. Nutrients enter plants via the root system in solution. Nutrients are soluble, but they are not equal in terms of volume, some molecular combinations taking more room than others. Magnesium is a nutrient that is more compact. High soil pH reduces its availability to plants while low pH floods the plant, injuring it.

Role of Fertilizer

Nutrients delivered via fertilizers allow plants to use water, carbon dioxide, and solar energy in combination with specific plant supplements, those nutrients. This permits the plants to produce enzymes, proteins, and other essentials to nurture the plants.

Magnesium’s Role in Plant Growth

Chlorophyll photosynthesizes plant energy using positive magnesium ions taken in through the plant root system. This key nutrient turns on plant growth as an enzyme activator and has functions in leaf health and seed production. When leaves yellow while their vein system is green, that plant is likely low in magnesium.

Chlorine’s Role in Plant Growth

Chloride is also necessary for photosynthesis, entering plant root systems as negatively-charged chlorine ions. Plants need chloride to maintain leaf health too and is a natural for combination with positively-charged magnesium. Excess chloride will cause leaf burn.

Canadian Regulation of Fertilizers

Magnesium sources for fertilizer have been commercial limestone and magnesium wedded with oxide, sulfate, or chloride. Magnesium chloride along with all other fertilizers are regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The Agency assures that magnesium-containing fertilizers are safe for plants, animals, and our environment, whether produced in Canada or imported. Magnesium products are regulated as “Registered Farm Fertilizers,” “Registered Micronutrients,” or “Registered Supplements.”

Identifying “Organic” Magnesium Fertilizers

Magnesium cannot be synthesized because it is an atomic element. The real issue for organic farmers relates to the method of formulating magnesium chloride (and other magnesium alternatives) for organic crop cultivation. The CFIA oversees the Canadian Organic Standards (COS), a national approach to maintaining a substance list compatible with organic agriculture, first promulgated in 1999.

Magnesium Chloride Supplier

Magnesium is readily available as a macronutrient in both “organic” and conventional farming fertilizing applications. The CFIA registration and its COS are your assurance that your version of magnesium meets Canadian standards.

Food Movement News

Subscribe to this category Subscribe via RSS
SOILheader2014
Posted on December 3, 2015 by Dana

CASE STUDIES FROM SHARED OPPORTUNITIES ON INSTITUTIONAL LAND

Project SOIL is a feasibility study that explores the potential of on-site food production for public institutions through arrangements with […]

Read more

setting-the-table
Posted on December 3, 2015 by Dana

COMING UP WITH A CANADIAN FOOD POLICY

Watch this very important talk by Food Secure Canada’s Executive Director Diana Bronson. In this TedX Talk, Diana discusses how food […]

Read more

headercollage_bestof
Posted on December 3, 2015 by Dana

FORKS HELPING FARMS

Small-scale farmers, fishers and foragers provide about 70% of the world’s food (ETC, 2009). Bon Appetit Management Company respects the hard […]

Read more

CAFS-logo
Posted on December 3, 2015 by Dana

APPLY FOR FUNDING TO ATTEND CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF FOOD STUDIES CONFERENCE – MAY 2015

The Canadian Association of Food Studies (CAFS) meets annually as a part of Congress to share emerging research, connect and […]

Read more